Archive for quote

apps fail because…

  • You Didn’t Understand The Problem You Were Solving
  • You Asked Your Friends What They Thought
  • You Listened To Users Instead Of Watching Them
  • You Didn’t Test Your Riskiest Assumption
  • You Had A “Bob The Builder” Mentality

“…Sharon says it’s as simple as validating, or invalidating, three core pieces of the plan: The problem (Is the app solving a problem people care about?), the market (Are there enough people who have this problem?), and the product (Is our product solving this problem for this market?).

http://www.fastcodesign.com/3033092/googles-6-reasons-why-nobody-uses-your-app

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too busy to watch the ads on TV

Should game session length mirror the length of ad breaks on TV?

“While 50 percent of DVR users would routinely skip ads, “the number is declining now,” said Poltrack, “because they’re too busy on their phones to fast-forward through the ads,” given that two-thirds of users watch TV while also engaged with a second screen.

http://www.adweek.com/news/television/dont-panic-says-cbs-more-people-are-watching-tv-now-decade-ago-166313
via http://ben-evans.com

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when in doubt re-read rule 1

Rule one has two parts:

a. the customer is always right

b. if that’s not true, it’s unlikely that this person will remain your customer.

If you need to explain to a customer that he’s wrong, that everyone else has no problem, that you have tons of happy customers who were able to successfully read the instructions, that he’s not smart enough or persistent enough or handsome enough to be your customer, you might be right. But if you are, part b kicks in and you’ve lost him.

If you find yourself litigating, debating, arguing and most of all, proving your point, you’ve forgotten something vital: people have a choice, and they rarely choose to do business with someone who insists that they are wrong.

By all means, fire the customers who aren’t worth the time and the trouble. But understand that the moment you insist the customer is wrong, you’ve just started the firing process.

PS here’s a great way around this problem: Make sure that the instruction manual, the website and the tech support are so clear, so patient and so generous that customers don’t find themselves being wrong.

http://sethgodin.typepad.com/seths_blog/2014/07/when-in-doubt-re-read-rule-one.html

Not everyone who talks about projects are customers (as defined by them having spend money on the product), however they have an impact on brand, community and customers. Understanding how you deal with the customers & community around a brand is a big deal to live service products.

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if you decide to be in the dog food business…

Be delighted to eat dog food.

It makes no sense to disdain the choices your customers make. If you can’t figure out how to empathize and eagerly embrace the things they embrace, you are letting everyone down with your choice. Sure, someone needs to make this, but it doesn’t have to be you.

If you treat the work as nothing but an obligation, you will soon be overwhelmed by competition that sees it as a privilege and a calling

http://sethgodin.typepad.com/seths_blog/2014/08/if-you-choose-to-be-in-the-dog-food-business-.html

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pick the right number of choices

Every choice takes some mental energy. Make the choices you offer the player ones that matter and that they should care about. Don’t make them burn energy on thinks that don’t matter or aren’t meaningful. 

The only thing worse than never having a choice is always having to choose 

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YouTube and Twitch are part of the game designers ecosystem

“Because there’s so much awesome stuff that’s happening on YouTube, the videos that people are posting, the amazing creations that people are making on Minecraft, all the League of Legends stuff – this didn’t exist before. I think the innovation is just happening in a place where it might be a little bit outside of the control of the developer.”

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thinking about delighting users

“That’s been really the challenge that I’ve been suffering: how can we look at the business differently rather than thinking about ARPU’s, what the numbers are, what knobs to turn etc? Instead, we should be thinking about what experiences can we deliver that are going to delight users. The crazy thought that I was giving with the talk today was I believe that there are going to be companies out there that really practice and really understand the value of user experience over time.

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