Archive for project management

worry about where we are going

“When we have a clear sense of where we’re going, we are flexible in how we get there.”

Simon Sinek

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one wow after launch

There should be a plan for a ‘wow’ feature reasonable soon after launch

Eric Schmidt

With any service release there needs to be something in the pipe to release quickly enough to catch the early audience and wow them. Missing this opportunity is a big miss. Teams need to have the infrastructure and capacity in place to deliver something quickly. 

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think twice before using ingrained conventions

Game developers should think twice before including ingrained game conventions such as combat, death, and trial-and-error gameplay. Trial and error in games undermines emotional experiences and “keeps the machinery opaque.” It is un-immersive because it “chips away at the make-believe,” forcing the player to examine the game machinery to figure out how to beat the system.

and a really interesting blog post about Indie games as inspiration
http://www.theastronauts.com/2012/10/reboot-your-aaa-brain/

 

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are you data driven?

Pick the right metrics

  • Good metrics are consistent, quick to collect and cheap
  • And that they capture something your business cares about

Understand the differences between analytics and experiments

  • Analytics measures what is happening in your business
  • Experiments test responses to new ideas or approaches

Ask the right question of the data

  • Frame the right question to allow effective analysis of the data

Know the difference between correlation and causation

  • Correlation is where there is a data match, with or without a connection. Good correlation is important, although not an indication of cause.
    Causation is about direct cause and effect

Know the basics of data visualization

  • Am I presenting (summary/conclusion) or circulating data (reference)?
  • Use the right kind of chart to emphasis relationships
  • Be clear about the message you are trying to convey to support the audience’s understanding
  • Ensure that the visuals reflect the numbers
  • Make the data as memorable as possible

Learn statistics


https://hbr.org/2014/05/an-introduction-to-data-driven-decisions-for-managers-who-dont-like-math/

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5 questions that lead to your strategy

An excellent HBR article on strategy. Incluing the difference between it and plans or budgets. Answering these 5 questions will help lead to a clear, focused strategy that can then lead to a plan.

  • What is our winning aspiration?
  • Where will we play?
  • How will we win?
  • What capabilities need to be in place?
  • What management systems need to be instituted?

https://hbr.org/2013/02/dont-let-strategy-become-plann/

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master the WTM…M

According to ‘How Google Works’, Google’s 1-1 model is summarized as follows;

  • Performance on job requirements = Work & delivery focused
  • Relationships with peer groups = People and effectiveness
  • Management/Leadership = Coaching, guiding and feedback, are you working hard enough at recruitment
  • Innovation/Best Practice = Are you constantly moving forward, learning new things

As an alternative way to structure 1-1 meetings, focus on the 4 key topics of Work, Team, Management and Mastery WTMM.

* Work: performance delivering work requirements

* Team: relationships with peers and team

* Management: feedback, coaching & motivation

* Mastery: new learnings & opportunities, training goals

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three frogs

We like to tell audiences the fable about three frogs on a log. One frog decides to jump off; how many are left on the log? Some people say two, the obvious choice; others say none, figuring the first frog rocked the log and knocked the others off. But the answer is three, because deciding to do something isn’t the same as doing it.

A nice story to illustrate a point about making commitments.

http://www.bain.com/publications/articles/decision-insights-11-how-organizations-make-great-decisions.aspx

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