too busy to watch the ads on TV

Should game session length mirror the length of ad breaks on TV?

“While 50 percent of DVR users would routinely skip ads, “the number is declining now,” said Poltrack, “because they’re too busy on their phones to fast-forward through the ads,” given that two-thirds of users watch TV while also engaged with a second screen.

http://www.adweek.com/news/television/dont-panic-says-cbs-more-people-are-watching-tv-now-decade-ago-166313
via http://ben-evans.com

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when in doubt re-read rule 1

Rule one has two parts:

a. the customer is always right

b. if that’s not true, it’s unlikely that this person will remain your customer.

If you need to explain to a customer that he’s wrong, that everyone else has no problem, that you have tons of happy customers who were able to successfully read the instructions, that he’s not smart enough or persistent enough or handsome enough to be your customer, you might be right. But if you are, part b kicks in and you’ve lost him.

If you find yourself litigating, debating, arguing and most of all, proving your point, you’ve forgotten something vital: people have a choice, and they rarely choose to do business with someone who insists that they are wrong.

By all means, fire the customers who aren’t worth the time and the trouble. But understand that the moment you insist the customer is wrong, you’ve just started the firing process.

PS here’s a great way around this problem: Make sure that the instruction manual, the website and the tech support are so clear, so patient and so generous that customers don’t find themselves being wrong.

http://sethgodin.typepad.com/seths_blog/2014/07/when-in-doubt-re-read-rule-one.html

Not everyone who talks about projects are customers (as defined by them having spend money on the product), however they have an impact on brand, community and customers. Understanding how you deal with the customers & community around a brand is a big deal to live service products.

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how to tell an enchanting story

Mostly in the context of telling stories for children on the fly, good advice for general storytelling;
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/elaine-ambrose/how-to-tell-an-enchanting_b_7883932.html

1. Begin with a provocative set-up
2. Explain how something happens, either to the main character or the environment
3. In one or two sentences, tell how the plot thickens. The stakes are raised when tension appears
4. Mentally analyze the reaction of the audience and adjust accordingly. If the listeners aren’t engaged by this time, strengthen the narrative
5. Build a vision of a scene that involves the senses: sight, sound, taste, vision, and touch
6. Weave a climax that produces an “aha” moment for the audience
7. End when the story is resolved
8. Record your story. To improve your storytelling abilities, record yourself reciting an original fable

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if you decide to be in the dog food business…

Be delighted to eat dog food.

It makes no sense to disdain the choices your customers make. If you can’t figure out how to empathize and eagerly embrace the things they embrace, you are letting everyone down with your choice. Sure, someone needs to make this, but it doesn’t have to be you.

If you treat the work as nothing but an obligation, you will soon be overwhelmed by competition that sees it as a privilege and a calling

http://sethgodin.typepad.com/seths_blog/2014/08/if-you-choose-to-be-in-the-dog-food-business-.html

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politicians use the focusing effect

The Focusing Effect – People place too much importance on one aspect of an event and fail to recognize other factors
http://www.entrepreneur.com/article/236681

Could be useful when thinking about presenting choices to the player in negotiations, where the information we provide doesn’t have to be ‘fair’. In most circumstances you want the UI information provided to the player to fairly represent the data and encourage a reasonable skilled choice from the player. In negotiations, or in situations of political will, the ‘character’ wants to manipulate the player and can lie, cheat and skew the information that they present to the player. It is then up to the player to use their knowledge, skill, perception etc to understand the situation in front of them.

“Nothing In Life Is As Important As You Think It Is, While You Are Thinking About It” – Daniel Kahneman

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WHY ARE CAPITAL LETTERS HARDER TO READ?

Why are texts written all in capitals more difficult to read than words in small letters? There are several reasons, including:

  • At least for native English speakers, children usually learn to read and write small letters before capital letters.
  • In English, capital letters give us many visual clues, such as the start of a sentence or a proper noun.
  • For the same type size, capital letters are usually wider than small letters and therefore take up more space, causing the eye to travel further.
  • Words written in capital letters have no “shape”. Words with small letters go up and down. Some small letters have “ascenders” (like the letter b). They go up. Some small letters have “descenders” (like the letter p). They go down. Some small letters have no ascender or descender. They stay in the middle. So small letters vary in height. But all capital letters are the same height (BP). When we read text, especially when we read fast, we do not read each individual letter. Instead, we read whole words and phrases. And we recognize these words and phrases partly by their shape.

http://www.englishclub.com/writing/caps1.htm

Worth considering for presentations and documents.

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worry about where we are going

“When we have a clear sense of where we’re going, we are flexible in how we get there.”

Simon Sinek

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