Archive for research

waiting for merlot

Anticipation…

…suggests that the anticipation leading up to an experience makes it more satisfactory than the anticipation to an item purchase. Additionally, the study suggests that the longer that anticipation period is, the more people enjoy the experience when it finally happens.

http://lifehacker.com/you-might-enjoy-an-experience-more-the-longer-you-have-1628185690

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avoid group think technique

  • Note down ideas, together in silence (5 mins)
  • Self Edit (2 mins)
  • Share and capture on the board (5 mins)
  • Vote, individually and quietly (2-5 mins)
  • Share and capture, short precise not sales pitches, mark board (2-5 mins)
  • Decide, owner/leader chooses not group. Votes = input in to discussion 
  • Rejoice…

Why does it work?

  • Quiet time to think
  • Parallel is better than serial
  • Voting commitment

http://www.fastcodesign.com/3034772/innovation-by-design/note-and-vote-how-google-ventures-avoids-groupthink-in-meetings 

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wide reading pain

We know that people often have rather wide screens and suffer reading disruptions as a side effect of trying to read lines that are 10 inches wide (that is, between 20-50 words wide). While most people feel that’s uncomfortable, what they don’t realize is that they can easily resize the window to make the (word) wrapping much better for them.

http://www.fastcompany.com/3004069/google-researcher-reveals-4-crucial-things-average-users-should-know-dont

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we need to think more about thinking

"To make better decisions, we need to think more about thinking."

–James Montier

http://www.fastcompany.com/magazine/104/prophet.html

Think Watson’s RED model of critical thinking’

Recognize Assumptions

This is the ability to separate fact from opinion. It is deceptively easy to listen to a comment or presentation and assume the information presented is true even though no evidence was given to back it up. Noticing and questioning assumptions helps to reveal information gaps or unfounded logic. Taking it a step further, when we examine assumptions through the eyes of different people (e.g., the viewpoint of different stakeholders), the end result is a richer perspective on a topic.

Evaluate Arguments

The art of evaluating arguments entails analyzing information objectively and accurately, questioning the quality of supporting evidence, and understanding how emotion influences the situation. Common barriers include confirmation bias, or allowing emotions-yours or others-to get in the way of objective evaluation. People may quickly come to a conclusion simply to avoid conflict. Being able to remain objective and sort through the validity of different positions helps people draw more accurate conclusions.

Draw Conclusions

People who possess this skill are able to bring diverse information together to arrive at conclusions that logically follow from the available evidence, and they do not inappropriately generalize beyond the evidence. Furthermore, they will change their position when the evidence warrants doing so. They are often characterized as having "good judgment" because they typically arrive at a quality decision.

http://thinkwatson.com/learn-introduction-to-the-red-model.php

5 characteristics of a critical thinker

A journalist taught me about critical thinking and writing/editing. It’s important to vet and uncover more than one side to a story. See if you or your business associates have one or more of these characteristics (adapted from the Wikipedia entry). Do you:

  1. raise important questions and problems, formulating them clearly and precisely;
  2. gather and assess relevant information, using abstract ideas to interpret it effectively
  3. come to well-reasoned conclusions and solutions, testing them against relevant criteria and standards;
  4. think open-mindedly within alternative systems of thought, recognizing and assessing, as need be, your assumptions, implications, and practical consequences; and
  5. communicate effectively with others in figuring out solutions to complex problems; without being unduly influenced by others’ thinking on the topic.

These abilities are critical in business strategy — and in life. I particularly like the concept of suspending judgment.

http://www.conversationagent.com/2010/05/critical-thinking-underpinning-of-effective-business-strategy.html

How do you know?

These four words make a great jump-start to critical thinking. If it isn’t clear, ask, “How do you know?”

http://critical-thinkers.com/2010/09/1140/

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do you want to be fast and sloppy?

“59% of American’s surf and watch TV at the same time” Nielsen report, and the numbers are increasing with every survey done. Smartphones provide connectivity options 24/7 everywhere.

Yet, multitasking allows you to be faster, and achieve sloppier results.

http://bigthink.com/ideas/24195#ooid=l4c3M0MTrmH1JwCX7jfRJWMi52uM5-H-

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frugal innovation

image

Being budget minded, focused on simplicity, challenging of the design & the processes and being aware of the implications of huge market sizes. Focus on customer.

“The term is quite commonly used in countries such as India or China to describe a specific kind of innovation which takes great care to minimise costs of innovation and cost of final product.

http://elearning.heacademy.ac.uk/wiki/index.php/Frugal_innovation

“Frugal innovation is not just about redesigning products; it involves rethinking entire production processes and business models. Companies need to squeeze costs so they can reach more customers, and accept thin profit margins to gain volume. Three ways of reducing costs are proving particularly successful.”

  • Contract out more work
  • Use existing technology in imaginative ways
  • Apply mass-production technique in new and unexpected areas

The Economist’s special report on innovation in emerging markets http://www.economist.com/specialreports/displaystory.cfm?story_id=15879359

Jeff Bezos;

Q: The company has a reputation for frugality. Does that apply to the way you innovate?
A: I think frugality drives innovation, just like other constraints do. One of the only ways to get out of a tight box is to invent your way out. When we were [first] trying to acquire customers, we didn’t have money to spend on ad budgets. So we created the associates program, [which lets] any Web site link to us, and we give them a revenue share. We invented one-click shopping so we could make check-out faster. Those things didn’t require big budgets. They required thoughtfulness and focus on the customer.

http://www.businessweek.com/magazine/content/08_17/b4081064880218.htm

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do you have an arousal empathy gap?

would you like some cake?

Best intentions fall by the way side in the heat of the moment.
Ambitious plans seem impossible in the cold light of day.

Our ability to evaluate and make decisions changes depending on our state of mind, on our involvement or arousal. Better known as the hot-cold empathy gap.

“A hot-cold empathy gap is a cognitive bias in which a person underestimates the influences of visceral drives…”

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Empathy_gap

Converting free users in Freemium or Trial products could benefit from striking while the iron is hot, and offering tempting opportunities while the user or player are ‘hot’.

from Nudge, by Richard H Thaler and Cass R Sunstein.

“Two factors must be introduced in order to understand the cashew phenomenon: temptation and mindlessness. Human beings have been aware of the concept of temptation at least since the time of Adam and Eve, but for purposes of understanding the value of nudges, that concept needs elaboration. What does it mean for something to be "tempting"?

“…temptation is easier to recognize than to define. Our preferred definition requires recognizing that people’s state of arousal varies over time… We will call something ‘tempting’ if we consume more of it when hot than when cold.

“…Most people realize that temptation exists, and they take steps to overcome it. …For most of us, however, self-control issues arise because we underestimate the effect of arousal.

“Self-control problems can be illuminated by thinking about an individual as containing two semiautonomous selves, a far-sighted "Planner" and a myopic "Doer." You can think of the Planner as speaking for your Reflective System, or the Mr Spock lurking within you, and the Doer as heavily influenced by the Automatic System, or everyone’s Homer Simpson. The Planner is trying to promote your long-term welfare but must cope with the feelings, mischief, and strong will of the Doer, who is exposed to the temptations that come with arousal. … Some parts of the brain get tempted, and other parts are prepared to enable us to resist temptation by assessing how we should react to the temptation.”

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